HMS Trincomalee

Hartlepool - (once the monkey hanging capital of the British Empire), alas is not overly well stocked with National Treasures however over the past 10 or so years there has been much investment and development of the marina/dock facilities. Once of the success stories has been the Royal Navy Museum, Hartlepool.

With this being the last day of 2016, we decided to go and see what the deal was for ourselves.

Hartlepool Museum

Free - take note York Minster !! An excellent collection of things relating to old and modern Hartlepool, with more focus on ships and on the Wars that took a very heavy toll on their shipping.

HMS Trincomalee

Floating, and yet surrounded by an 19th century houses sits HMS Trincomalee, which was build on the island of Sri Lanka. Restored in Hartlepool and has been exhibited here for a few years.

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Main Deck

Crewed by 240 men, when you first walk onto the top deck - you think there will be enough space. It is only as you descend into the ship - that the feeling of closeness starts building upon you.

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The masts with their myriad of stays, were howling in the wind as a decent north east breeze whilstled by.

Dora tried her hand at steering - only then to find out that up to 5 men were deployed in this task for real !!

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View from the bow - looking astern. fn

Gun Deck

As we dropped down a deck - we entered the main gun-deck. This deck was the main fighing deck - and would have been amazingly busy in a battle. After about 2 minutes I was reminded about a vow I made several years ago when sailing to India - never sail on a yacht I can not stand up fully in!!. The gun deck had pockets that were 193 cm tall - but most of the time I am walking bend double.

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Captains cabin

In stark contrast as to how the enlisted men were treated - the captain had a splended cabin.

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The high tech cot for the captain.

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Lower deck

With modern lighting this deck did not seem to worrying - but I then tried to imagine how dark it would have been in reality - with few lights - or candles - simply navigating your way around here would have been very difficult.

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Orloop Deck

The final deck - where you could clearly see the keel - and the lead ballast. Interestingly was the steel water tank for the fresh water - which seemed a very sensible idea for the time.

Here and there were small access hatches - which no doubt all had a role to play on a warship such as this.

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The Headland

After leaving behind the oldest floating warship in the world, we indulged in some fish and chips before having a very bracing walk along the breakwater.

The North East winds were really blowing - and for the first time on the trip, Juliet felt cold to the core.

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Andy Capp

I am not just sure which paper the cartoon used to appear in - but Andy Capp was alledgedly a monkey hanger - so it was great to see his statue overlooking the mouth of hartlepool harbour. Juliet joined in the pose as you can see.

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Gallery

There are some more photos including these in the gallery.